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Jun
27
2011

A closer look at the Soviet “Extraordinary State Commission”(ESC) which claimed to have investigated “Fascist Crimes” Part II

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By Wilfried Heink-

The second subchapter in the essay by Marina Sorokina is titled:

A Broad and Authoritative Public Committee, Not Bearing Any Official Character

The idea of creating a special public organ for the investigation of Nazi war crimes was raised in the USSR at the very beginning of World War II, although for a long time the Soviet leadership did nothing about it.” writes Sorokina.[1] Then on 6 August 1941, Iakov Semenovich Khavinson 28:

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Written by Wilfried Heink in: War Crimes,World War II | Tags:
Jun
05
2011

A closer look at the Soviet “Extraordinary State Commission” (ESC) which claimed to have investigated “Fascist Crimes” Part I

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By Wilfried Heink-

“Slavica Publishers” in their Fall 2005 Journal “Kritika” published an article by Marina A. Sorokina titled:

People and Procedures: Toward a History of the Investigation of Nazi Crimes in the USSR”.

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Written by Wilfried Heink in: War Crimes,World War II | Tags:
Dec
13
2009

Finland in the eye of the storm

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In 2005, as near as I can tell, a Finish author, Erkki Hautamäki, published a book titled “Finland i stormens öga” (Finland in the eye of the storm). The book was published first in Swedish, a second volume is pending and a German edition is being prepared. Here is a little write-up about the book:
http://www.prokarelia.net/en/?x=artikkeli&article_id=667&author=10

Chapter 10 deals with a pact between Churchill and Stalin, the French are also part of the plan. I was able to obtain a German translation of this chapter and translated it into English. I would like to thank Veronica Clark for her assistance.

Some of what Hautamäki writes I do not agree with, but my opinion is not the issue here. Hopefully the German edition will be available soon, allowing for a more contextual approach. The second volume should also help, but until that happens, here then Chapter 10.
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Written by admin in: World War II | Tags:
Aug
24
2009

The Traitors in the Officer Corps of the German Armed Forces

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By Wilfried Heink-

Following World War I, Germany’s army was demoralized, reduced to groups of free lance mercenaries. Discipline, the core of any army, especially in the German/Prussian army, was no longer. This breakdown had already started in the last month of WWI, when German troops who had been exposed to the Bolshevik virus while on the eastern front, were transferred west after the treaty of Brest-Litovsk. Soldier counsels (Soviets) were formed and Officers orders questioned or ignored (“The Kings Depart…”, by Richard M. Watt, pp.142ff). Strikes broke out in Germany which affected the war effort, the Kaiser, the Commander in Chief, forced to abdicate, in short, the Officers felt that they were stabbed in the back (Dolchstoss). Under the Versailles Diktat, Germany’s armed forces were reduced to 100 000 lightly armed forces. The Officer core, a proud clan, was devastated. (Read more…)

Written by Wilfried Heink in: National Socialism,Spy/Traitor Dilemma,World War II | Tags:
Jun
13
2009

Who started WWII?

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By Wilfried Heink-

On Thursday, June 4, 2009 an article appeared in The Washington Post, titled “Russian military historian blames Poland for WWII”.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/04/AR2009060402281.html

The Poles protested, of course, but it appears that here too history is being re-written, as is the case with “Barbarossa”. Following WWII, authors like Annelies von Ribbentrop and Heinrich Härtle have tried to set the record straight, showing clearly that Poland was to blame. The books written by them were inconvenient history, not fitting into the distorted version that was emerging, according to which only Hitler and the Germans were to blame. Recently, however, this issue has surfaced again, thanks to Dr. Walter Post (Unternehmen Barbarossa) and Gerd-Schultze-Rhonhof (Der Krieg der viele Väter hatte), to just name two. Those book were not well received, and the authors placed in the “extreme right” corner, accused of being Hitler apologists. But now it looks as if they are getting help from, who would have guessed, Russia.
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Written by Wilfried Heink in: World War II | Tags: