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Feb
20
2016

Remembering Bradley R. Smith

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By Richard A. Widmann.

Bradley R. Smith: (18 Feb 1930 - 18 Feb 2016)

Bradley R. Smith: A Simple Writer (18 Feb 1930 – 18 Feb 2016)

On Thursday evening, 18 February 2016, I glanced at my email on my phone. The subject of a newly received message struck me like a lightning bolt. “Bradley RIP” was all it said. It wasn’t that it was entirely unexpected. Bradley had been ill for many years, fighting off heart ailments, cancer, and even a bullet to the head during the Korean War, but somehow it seemed that Bradley would always be among us.

I first became aware of Bradley in the late 80s. I had discovered him a couple of years after my introduction to Holocaust revisionism. I knew of him through his book, Confessions of a Holocaust Revisionist and the work that he did for the Institute for Historical Review.

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Written by Widmann in: Revisionists | Tags:
Feb
17
2016

Inconvenient History 2015: The Year in Review

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By Richard A. Widmann.

nagasaki_bomb

Readership explodes in 2015!

The year 2015 was another great year for free historical inquiry. On our primary website, users were up 23.87% from 69,635 in 2014 to 86,254. We also experienced an 18.76% increase in page views from 201,536 to 239,400. Readership remains largest in the United States. The next three runners up were Great Britain, Germany, and France.

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Written by Widmann in: Historical Revisionism,Revisionists | Tags:
Sep
26
2015

CODOH Announced as New Publisher of Inconvenient History

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By Richard A. Widmann.

CODOH becomes publisher of IH

CODOH becomes publisher of IH

Inconvenient History is pleased to announce that the Committee for Open Debate on the Holocaust (CODOH) has become our new publisher.  CODOH is the longest running organization struggling for a free and open debate on the subject of the Holocaust.  CODOH was founded in 1990 to encourage a free exchange of ideas with regard to the orthodox Holocaust narrative.

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Jan
31
2015

Inconvenient History 2014: The Year in Review

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By Richard A. Widmann-

zyklon_b

Thomas Dalton’s “The Great Holocaust Mystery” was our most-read article of 2014

As 2014 came to a close, Inconvenient History (www.inconvenienthistory.com) closed the door on its sixth year of activities. In our online journal, we published another 32 articles by some of the leading voices in historical revisionism in the world today. In addition, we printed hardcopy annual of our complete works from 2013. This volume is comprised over 500 pages of revisionist scholarship and continues to sell at a healthy rate through Amazon.com. In addition, another 20 articles were posted to the “Inconvenient History – Independent Revisionist Blog” (http://revblog.codoh.com/ ). Finally many hundreds of news posts were made to Twitter where @inconhistory has accumulated 483 followers. In a typical week our retweet reach can reach over 1,800 people.

Throughout 2014, pages of the Inconvenient History flagship journal were viewed 200,775 times by some 69,378 users. This represents a 15% increase over 2013. Our best day was 3 September when our pages were viewed some 8,542 times. While most of our readership is from the United States, 2014 saw a 105% increase in readership in the United Kingdom, an astounding 472% increase in Australia and a whopping increase of 722% in Canada.

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Written by Widmann in: Historical Revisionism | Tags:
Jun
25
2014

Remembering George Orwell (1903 – 1950)

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By Richard Widmann-

Orwell's 1984 was a major influence on historical revisionists including Harry Elmer Barnes

Orwell’s 1984 was a major influence on historical revisionists including Harry Elmer Barnes

George Orwell was born on this day in 1903 in Motihari, India. George Orwell, the pen name of the English author Eric Arthur Blair was a great influence on Twentieth Century revisionism including revisionist pioneer Harry Elmer Barnes. In his important essay, “How ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ Trends Threaten American Peace, Freedom, and Prosperity,” Barnes documented the prophetic nature of Orwell’s classic. Barnes wrote:

Orwell’s book is the keenest and most penetrating work produced in this generation on the current trends in national policy and world affairs. To discuss world trends today without reference to the Orwell frame of reference is not unlike writing on biology without reference to Darwin, Mendel, and De Vries…

Orwell was educated in England at Eton College. After service with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927, he returned to Europe to become a writer. He lived for several years in poverty. His earliest experiences resulted in the book Down and Out in Paris and London.
By 1936, Orwell had joined the Republican forces during the Spanish Civil War. Orwell was critical of communism but basically considered himself a socialist. He was wounded in the fighting. Late in the war, Orwell fought the communists and eventually had to flee Spain for his life. He documented many of his experiences during the Spanish Civil War in his Homage to Catalonia.

Orwell’s experiences with totalitarian political regimes had a direct impact on his writing. His best-known books reflect his opposition to totalitarianism: Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. In an article entitled, “Why I Write” Orwell explained:

Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism… Animal Farm was the first book in which I tried, with full consciousness of what I was doing, to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole.

During the Second World War, Orwell wrote a weekly radio political commentary designed to counter German and Japanese propaganda in India. His wartime work for the BBC gave him a solid taste of bureaucratic hypocrisy. Many believe that this experience provided the inspiration for his invention of “newspeak,” the truth-denying language of Big Brother’s rule in his novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Throughout his lifetime, the great English author continually questioned all “official” or “accepted” versions of history. At the conclusion of the war in Europe, Orwell expressed doubt about the Allied account of events and posed the following question in his book Notes on Nationalism, “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear… Is it true about the gas ovens in Poland?”

Orwell died on 21 January 1950 in London at the early age of forty-seven of a neglected lung ailment. He left behind a substantial body of work and a reputation for greatness.

Partial Bibliography

  • Down and Out in Paris and London (1933)
  • Burmese Days (1934)
  • A Clergyman’s Daughter (1935)
  • Keep the Aspidistra Flying (1936)
  • The Road to Wigan Pier (1937)
  • Homage to Catalonia (1938)
  • Coming up for Air (1939)
  • Inside the Whale, and Other Essays (1940)
  • Animal Farm (1945)
  • Nineteen Eighty-four (1949)
  • Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays (1950)
  • Such, Such Were the Joys (1953)
Jun
15
2014

Remembering Harry Elmer Barnes (15 June 1889 – 25 August 1968)

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By Richard A. Widmann-

Following WWII, Barnes attempted to  “bring history into accord with the facts.”

Following WWII, Barnes attempted to “bring history into accord with the facts.”

Harry Elmer Barnes was born on this day in 1889. Earlier in the year Benjamin Harrison was sworn in as the 23rd President of the United States. John Philip Sousa’s Marine Corps Band played at the Inaugural Ball with a large crowd in attendance. North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington were added to the union increasing the number of stars on the American flag to 38. The first issue of The Wall Street Journal was published in New York City.

Later that year Thomas Edison screened his very first motion picture, launching a new entertainment medium and an industry centered on moving pictures. Jefferson Davis, the former president of the Confederate States of America died that December at the age of 81.

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Written by Widmann in: Historical Revisionism,Revisionists | Tags:
May
06
2014

Interview: Wilf Heink

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By Richard A. Widmann-

Otto von Bismarck

Revisionism should start with Bismarck’s reunification of Germany in 1871

Widmann: For readers who may not know you, could you explain how you first became involved in historical revisionism?

Heink: I was born in 1937, in Germany, a long story and not the issue here. In 1959 my wife and I, along with our 1-year-old son, moved to Canada. At first, World War II was still being fought when talking to Canadians, with “The Holocaust” creeping in only later. I was young and busy trying to make a living, and really had no reason to doubt the official version – what is presented as history. But this constant “Germany responsible for all the ills” started to grate on me, and having opted to get out of the rat race, I moved to a small village where I decided to take a closer look. That was in 1982. By then, the letters to the editor of a German newspaper published in Canada made me think doubts as to the veracity of the official version had crept in, The communist empire collapsed; it had failed to bring about the “One World Government” and had therefore become useless. Shortly thereafter I read in that German paper that the Auschwitz death toll, mostly Jews we were told, had been reduced from 4 million to 1.5 million, at first; it now stands at 1.1 million. I still remember when I read this and where I was, for I was sure that now investigations will be undertaken, for if 2.5 million people, mostly Jews, can be misplaced, where else have mistakes been made?

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Apr
27
2014

The Precedent of the Spanish-American War

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By Richard A. Widmann-

Sinking of the Maine used to incite war hysteria

Sinking of the Maine used to incite war hysteria

April 25th marked the anniversary of the Spanish-American War. While barely a notice appeared in the American media, the Spanish-American War of 1898 was instrumental in transforming the United States into an empire. It also established a precedent for the subsequent conflicts of the 20th Century in that the media played a major role in disseminating propaganda intended to rouse public support for war.

In early 1898 President McKinley sent the USS Maine to Havana to protect American interests during the long-standing revolt of the Cubans against the Spanish government. On the evening of 15 February, a mysterious explosion suddenly blew up the Maine. Nearly three-quarters of the battleship’s crew died as a result of the explosion. The immediate assumption was that the sinking of the Maine and the deaths of 260 sailors was the result of Spanish treachery.

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Written by Widmann in: Historical Revisionism,Propaganda | Tags:
Apr
18
2014

Dr. Henri Roques has died

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By Richard A. Widmann-

Henri Roques (1920-2014)

On 16 March 2014, Dr. Henri Roques died.  Roques, who was 93 at the time of his death, had spent a week in the hospital having been admitted for a double pulmonary embolism.

Roques was born in Lyon on 10 November 1920. A revisionist pioneer, he became interested in revisionism in 1955, when he discovered Le Mensonge d’Ulysse (The Lie of Ulysses) by Paul Rassinier. Roques began to correspond with Rassinier and remained friends with him until his death in 1967.

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Written by Widmann in: Eye-witnesses,Revisionists | Tags:
Apr
13
2014

Remembering the Russian Crime at Katyn

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By Richard A. Widmann-

RIAN archive 897469 Handover of Katyn forest massacre materials to Poland

This week, Russian lawmakers passed a bill that would make Holocaust revisionism illegal.  The bill introduces criminal charges for “denying facts” established by the Nuremberg tribunal regarding the crimes of the Axis powers, as well as “disseminating false information about Soviet actions” during the war.  Punishment for such violations would range from a fine of 300,000 rubles ($9,230) and up to five years imprisonment.

While time is expected to reduce the emotions surrounding war, the Second World War is an exception.  The myths of the past are being canonized not only into popular expression but into law itself.  The Soviet Union’s atrocities during this period rarely fall under scrutiny.

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